Steven Peet has had 6 years added to his sentence for the  brutal murder of Adeline Wilson-Rigney, her  daughter Amber Rose and son Korey Lee Mitchell, aged 6 and 5

Steven Peet has had 6 years added to his sentence for the brutal murder of Adeline Wilson-Rigney, her daughter Amber Rose and son Korey Lee Mitchell, aged 6 and 5

More great news ! it would seem the system is finally starting to take crimes against children seriously, though we still have a long way to go.

Yesterday QLD Attornry-General Yvette D’Ath announced she had lodged an appeal on the sentence given to William O’Sullivan for the manslaughter of Mason Jet Lee, this followed the news that Steven Peet who horrifically murdered his then girlfriend Adeline Wilson-Rigney and her 2 innocent children Amber Rose and Korey Lee Mitchell has had another 6 years added to his non-parole period.

The best part was that Steven Peet was already sentenced to life behind bars with a 30 year non-parole period and the South Australian Director of Public Prosecutions still agreed it was manifestly inadequate, and the court of criminal appeal also agreed and gave him another 6 years behind bars !

Maybe we are beginning to see a shift in attitudes, maybe our message is getting out there….. We’d really like to hope so 😊

We would like to thank Chief Justice Chris Kourakis and Justices Sam Doyle and Martin Hinton for standing up for the children and increasing Steven Peet’s sentence.

We would also like to acknowledge little Amber and Korey’s grandparents Steven Egberts and Janet Wells who have fought hard to have this sentence increased and to bring attention to the lack of justice for the children. Mr Egberts stated he still believes the sentence is inadequate and not in line with what the community expects. His family believe Peet should not be released from prison and considering the fact Peet murdered 2 irreplaceable innocent children and their mother, we totally agree with him.

A child’s life should be valued by our legal system and the purposeful taking of that life should result in a mandatory minimum sentence of life behind bars. Life meaning LIFE.

We all remember the family of Hemi Goodwin-Burke and their fight to have the ridiculously light sentence, given to Hemi’s killer, appealed. It is infuriating to know what that beautiful little boy suffered before finally succumbing to the horrific injuries inflicted upon him and to know his killer could be free very soon.

We can only hope this case being successfully appealed and little Mason’s killer’s sentence being appealed will lead to Justice for Hemi and for every other child whose life was stolen from them.

FACAA will keep fighting to change the social attitudes and the laws that allow judges to hand out these disgustingly low sentences to child abusers and child killers. We will keep writing the posts based on the recent news events and we will get the posters shared across social media. This IS having an affect and people’s eyes are being opened to the reality of the child abuse situation in Australia. Child abuse is happening on every street, in every suburb, of every city, in every state of Australia and every country in our world. The sooner people realise this is affecting them, their friends and family, the sooner they will join the fight to end it once and for all.

Rest in peace Adeline Wilson-Rigney, her daughter Amber Rose and son Korey Lee Mitchell. We hope the fact that the pathetic coward who murdered you all will serve even longer behind bars and will not be eligible for parole until he is 68 years old, brings you some sort of peace.
Fly high precious little ones.

#FACAA #ProudFACAA #SA #SAPOL #SAPolice #RIPKoreyLeeMitchell #RIPAmberRose #GuardiansOfTheInnocent #VoiceForTheVoiceless #HopeForTheHopeless #ChildrensChampions #EndingChildAbuse #RaisingAwareness #ChangingLaws #HealingSurvivors #ChangingLives #NeverGonnaStop #WeWIllFight #SaveTheKids #JuliasJustice #PhoenixProgram #SADirectorOfPublicProsecution #SADPP Full story from ABC.Net.Au below

A man who brutally murdered his partner and her two children at Hillier, north of Adelaide, has had his non-parole period increased by six years after the Court of Criminal Appeal found his original sentence was “manifestly inadequate”.
Steven Graham Peet was originally sentenced to life in prison with a non-parole period of 30 years for murdering his girlfriend Adeline Wilson-Rigney, her six-year-old daughter Amber Rose and five-year-old son Korey Lee Mitchell in 2016.
The court had previously heard all three victims had been strangled with cable ties and Peet had also attacked his girlfriend with a crowbar and tied up both children before killing them.
The Director of Public Prosecutions appealed against the sentence, arguing it was “manifestly inadequate”.
The Court of Criminal Appeal has now granted the appeal and fixed a new non-parole period of 36 years which was backdated to May 2016 when Peet was taken into custody.
The court, comprised of the Chief Justice Chris Kourakis and Justices Sam Doyle and Martin Hinton, found that the offending was too serious to warrant a non-parole period of 30 years.
“The children would quickly have realised the peril they were in. It must have been terrifying for them,” they said.
“They should have been able to look to the respondent for care and nurturing.
“The sentencing judge described the acts of killing the children as extremely reprehensible. Respectfully, he was right, but such words barely betray the repulsion the community feels when very young lives are taken.”
Sentence still not enough: grandfather
The children’s grandfather, Steven Egberts, said his family were struggling with the sentence and believed Peet should not be released from prison.

A man who brutally murdered his partner and her two children at Hillier, north of Adelaide, has had his non-parole period increased by six years after the Court of Criminal Appeal found his original sentence was “manifestly inadequate”.
Steven Graham Peet was originally sentenced to life in prison with a non-parole period of 30 years for murdering his girlfriend Adeline Wilson-Rigney, her six-year-old daughter Amber Rose and five-year-old son Korey Lee Mitchell in 2016.
The court had previously heard all three victims had been strangled with cable ties and Peet had also attacked his girlfriend with a crowbar and tied up both children before killing them.
The Director of Public Prosecutions appealed against the sentence, arguing it was “manifestly inadequate”.
The Court of Criminal Appeal has now granted the appeal and fixed a new non-parole period of 36 years which was backdated to May 2016 when Peet was taken into custody.
The court, comprised of the Chief Justice Chris Kourakis and Justices Sam Doyle and Martin Hinton, found that the offending was too serious to warrant a non-parole period of 30 years.
“The children would quickly have realised the peril they were in. It must have been terrifying for them,” they said.
“They should have been able to look to the respondent for care and nurturing.
“The sentencing judge described the acts of killing the children as extremely reprehensible. Respectfully, he was right, but such words barely betray the repulsion the community feels when very young lives are taken.”

The children’s grandfather, Steven Egberts, said his family were struggling with the sentence and believed Peet should not be released from prison.

“I think we were always going to feel let down. We don’t feel the sentence is appropriate. We don’t think that our justice system is in line with what public opinion is,” Mr Egberts said.
“I still find the sentence manifestly inadequate.
“I don’t think this is enough for what he did to those small children.”
He said he still had many questions about the involvement of child protection authorities and what others did or didn’t do for his grandchildren, and hoped a future coronial inquest would help provide some answers.
“We have all the hate in the world for Peet but there were people that left those children down there too and never did a thing to help them,” he said.

The court found the higher non-parole period was necessary to reflect the gravity of the crimes.
“A just sentence must accord due recognition to the human dignity of the victim of domestic violence and the legitimate interest of the general community in the denunciation and punishment of a brutal, alcohol-fuelled destruction of a woman by

“A failure on the part of the state to mete out a just punishment of violent offending may be seen as a failure by the state to vindicate the human dignity of the victim; and to impose a lesser punishment by reason of the identity of the victim is to create a group of second-class citizens, a state of affairs entirely at odds with the fundamental idea of equality before the law.
“A just sentence in the present case must accord due recognition to the human dignity of three victims.”
The judges said the loss was magnified when children were victims.
“The younger and more innocent the child the more the murderer repulses us as a community and the more grave or heinous the act of murder because of the value we place on life.
“Then there is the loss felt by the family. Here the family must deal with the loss of three of its members. That loss is similarly inestimable.

“The meaning that Ms Wilson-Rigney with all her faults and her two children brought to their family and the loss now felt deeply and enduringly, as is evident from the victim impact statements, must also be reflected in the non-parole period fixed.
“Bearing in mind the yardstick that the mandatory minimum non-parole period represents, we agree with the Director that the non-parole period imposed is manifestly inadequate.”
They said the murder of Ms Wilson-Rigney might have merited a starting point of 33 years.
The court found that “the only possible mitigatory factor is the degree of dissociation the respondent suffered” which it concluded was “not significantly mitigatory”.
The judges found an appropriate starting point of 39 years was appropriate but allowed a discount for Peet’s guilty pleas.
Peet will be eligible for parole when he is about 68 years old.

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